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Smart citizens in a learning city

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CHAPTER 1 – The city
CHAPTER 2 – The multi-stakeholder model
CHAPTER 3 – A dual-speed project
CHAPTER 4 – Company towns 

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Image: City hall of San José, designed by architect Richard Meier

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Audio: Rob Lloyd 

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Audio: Rob Lloyd

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In his view, change processes will only start to gain momentum if companies have the opportunity to bring their smart city technologies to cities independently and via their conventional sales channels. The city authorities lack the resources and expertise that is essential for agile development and to realize ambitious smart city visions.

“In US cities in particular, local government is dominated by political structures that date back to the 1930s and 1940s, and nobody thinks about how the role of the state could be redefined,” says the former Microsoft manager and employee at PARC, the Xerox research center. “Cities are so rigid and inflexible in their infrastructure that they are rendered unable to respond, or too slow to respond, to new technologies; they are not equipped to manage their relationships with technology companies.”


Steep believes the eventual change will be driven by the power of consumers, through the “democratization of technology”. “Consumers and consumer demand can force political agendas in a certain direction,” says Steep, who was previously also a member of the Smart London Board set up to assist the mayor of the UK capital with London’s smart city strategy. He cites the example of San Francisco-based transport provider Uber, which is also planning to roll out self-driving cars and trucks.

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Overview

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Chapter 1 Smart citizens in a learning city

Smart citizens in a learning city

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San jose karte

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Intro harkness

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